Walking to work slashes risk of diabetes


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Apart from saving money on commuting costs, walking to office is great way to remain healthy, claims a new study.

According to researchers people who use public transport, cycle or get to office on their own steam slash their risk of suffering from hypertension, diabetes and obesity (all impending dangers for heart and circulatory disease) compared to those who drive.

“This study highlights that building physical activity into the daily routine by walking, cycling or using public transport to get to work is good for personal health,” said researcher Anthony Laverty, from the School of Public Health at Imperial College London.

Impact of commuting on health explored
The focus of the study was to determine the impact of commuting habits on heath. Researchers surveyed 20,000 Britons about the ways they traveled to work.

Modes of travel varied extensively depending on the different parts of the United Kingdom. It was noted that 52 percent of people in London used public transit while only five percent did so in Northern Ireland.

Among the respondents 19 percent using private transport (cars, motorcycles or taxis) to reach their workplace were overweight as opposed to 15 percent who walked and 13 percent of those who cycled.

Findings
The analysis revealed cycling, walking, and using public transport was all linked with a lower risk of being obesity compared to driving or taking a taxi. People who strode off to work were 40 per cent less likely to develop diabetes than those who drove. Walkers were also 17 per cent less inclined to be afflicted with high blood pressure. The odds of cyclists developing diabetes was 50 percent lower than drivers.

“The variations between regions suggest that infrastructure and investment in public transport, walking and cycling can play a large role in encouraging healthy lives, and that encouraging people out of the car can be good for them as well as the environment,” said Laverty.

The findings are published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

From the medi journal

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