Overweight? Is it ‘committing suicide’ if you don’t take action?


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The Olympics have just been on, the nation is feeling inspired, but the mountain that you have to climb to get from the couch back to the fitness and weight loss you dream of seems a lifetime away.

First let me show you what’s at stake here if you choose to continue to not do anything about it.

For teenagers, the risks (and not exclusively to teens) include;

  • Blount disease. Excess weight on growing bones can lead to this bone deformity of the lower legs.
  • Arthritis. Wear and tear on the joints from carrying extra weight can cause this painful joint problem at a young age.
  • Slipped capital femoral epiphyses (SCFE). Obese children and teens are at greater risk for this painful hip problem. SCFE requires immediate attention and surgery to prevent further damage to the joint.
  • Asthma. Obesity is associated with breathing problems that can make it harder to keep up with friends, play sports, or just walk from class to class.
  • Sleep apnea. This condition (where a person temporarily stops breathing during sleep) is a serious problem for many overweight kids and adults. Not only does it interrupt sleep, sleep apnea can leave people feeling tired and affect their ability to concentrate and learn. It also may lead to heart problems.
  • High blood pressure. When blood pressure is high, the heart must pump harder and the arteries must carry blood that’s moving under greater pressure. If the problem continues for a long time, the heart and arteries may no longer work as well as they should. Although rare in most teens, high blood pressure, or hypertension, is more common in overweight or obese teens.
  • High cholesterol. Long before getting sick, obese teens may have abnormal blood lipid levels, including high cholesterol, low HDL (“good”) cholesterol, and high triglyceride levels. These increase the risk of heart attack and stroke when a person gets older.
  • Gallstones. An accumulation of bile that hardens in the gallbladder forms gallstones. These may be painful and require surgery.
  • Fatty liver. When fat accumulates in the liver, it can cause inflammation, scarring, and permanent liver damage.
  • Pseudotumor cerebri. This is a rare cause of severe headaches in obese teens and adults. There is no tumor, but pressure builds in the brain. In addition to headaches, symptoms may include vomiting, unsteady walking, and vision problems that might become permanent if not treated.
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Girls who are overweight may miss periods — or not get their periods at all — and might have elevated testosterone (the male hormone) levels in the blood. Although it’s normal for girls to have some testosterone in their blood, too much can interfere with normal ovulation and can cause excess hair growth, worsening acne, and male-type baldness. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance, a precursor to developing type 2 diabetes. Overweight women also might have fertility problems.
  • Insulin resistance and diabetes. When there is excess body fat, insulin is less effective at getting glucose, the body’s main source of energy, into cells. More insulin becomes needed to maintain a normal blood sugar. For some overweight teens, insulin resistance may progress to diabetes (high blood sugar).
  • Depression. People who are obese are more likely to be depressed and have lower self-esteem.

Luckily, it’s never too late to make changes that can effectively control weight and the health problems it causes. Those changes don’t have to be big.

SOME of the health risks for adults include:

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon)
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Dyslipidemia (for example, high total cholesterol or high levels of triglycerides)
  • Stroke
  • Liver and Gallbladder disease
  • Sleep apnea and respiratory problems
  • Osteoarthritis (a degeneration of cartilage and its underlying bone within a joint)
  • Gynaecological problems (abnormal menses, infertility)

What should you do about it? Where do you start?

  • cut out sugary foods and drinks. That includes diet!
  • moderate portion size, cut it back a bit, perhaps use a smaller plate
  • drink more – and I don’t mean coffee! Sometime we confuse hunger for thirst.
  • move more! Take the stairs not the lift, walk short distances you would usually drive.
  • Aim to include 15 mins exer use a day to start with
  • find a friend – it’s easier to cancel an appointment with yourself than with another person!

And after that?

Contact us! We will organise your schedule to include exercise that is practical and achievable around your life! Then we will MOT your diet and make sure we teach you how to have your cake and eat it! (Albeit smaller, and less frequent!) finally we will help you sort out your head and release the positive ‘I can do’ you that in inside all of us!

Email melanie@ryding2health.com today to find out more.

Take the fist step, change your life! If I can do it, then you can do it too.

One Comment on “Overweight? Is it ‘committing suicide’ if you don’t take action?

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